Training

I am no longer starting outside colts or taking in ‘problem’ type horses. I will accept a limited number of horses for training; after they have been ridden enough to be moving out freely and have some outside miles on them. My minimum is 60 rides.

 

Most of us want or need a horse with 90 to 120 rides. Many horse owners can get by with a 60 day youngster, but kick themselves down the road, wondering why they didn’t have more time put on their horse to begin with.  It takes a good 120 to 150 rides, in my opinion, to get that colt feeling more like a broke horse. There is just so much that needs to be accomplished to obtain that feel!  First of all, you need someone with enough knowledge and experience to get a ‘handle’ on the young horse. The facts are, that colt, even with plenty of quality rides, is still gonna do colt things. 

An old ‘broke horse’ doesn’t get that way in 1/2 a year of riding. It might actually take more like 5-8 years, depending on what’s been done with the horse, and who’s been on his back.  Everything we do begins with trust, and then we add our abilities to teach the horse how to handle life and everything it might throw at us.

Ideally, I like to take a horse for no less than 120 rides, and then get him back two or three different times over the years for extensive training to really advance the horse. This has proven to be the most successful for both horse and rider.

What you can expect from my training is that I will work to bring out the best in your horse to the best of my and his abilities. Not every horse will achieve the same handle, but will excel in different areas. The all around, or versatile horse is my expertise. They will have hours and hours of arena work geared toward making a safe, handy, respectful horse. This will include

  • working with a lead and lass rope

  •  flags and tarps

  • Dragging objects such as a log, tire and tarp

lYour horse will be trained toward reining type maneuvers, dressage movements and cowboy pleasure. It will be good with handling a rope, on a roping dummy or live cattle as I have the opportunity to get your horse around cattle when I Daywork. Your horse will get plenty of outside miles in the scabland hills behind our place or helping gather cattle. The more your horse is exposed to, the better he will be. We have a great obstacle course here at the ranch which only helps make your horse that much handier.

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